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Amazon Uakari Heritage Area
Mamirauá Reserve, Brazil

Amazon Uakari Heritage Area

Information

Description

The Mamirauá Reserve is the largest protected floodplain (“várzea”) area in the world. The Amazon várzea, which represent about 5% of the entire biome, are seasonally flooded areas, with two very distinct seasons: the flood and the dry season. In Mamirauá the water level varies about 10 metres annually. Surrounded by the Japurá rivers and, mainly, by the Solimões river, Mamirauá represents an abundance of natural resources. Its waters, rich in sediments from the Andes, enable the existence of a large riverside human population, which has good land for planting and plentiful fishing, in the dry season. In the flood, with all the forest flooded, most of the plants bear fruit, feeding the fauna, and the fish find refuge.

The biodiversity of Mamirauá is still in the process of research and knowledge. Currently, the Reserve has catalogued more than 300 species of birds, more than 600 species of fish, about 100 species of anurans and reptiles, and approximately 50 species of mammals. It shelters populations of emblematic Amazonian species, such as the pink river dolphin, jaguar, black caiman, arapaima, tambaqui fish as well as two species of primates exclusive to the várzea forests, the white uakari and the black-headed squirrel monkey (endemic to the reserve).More than anything, Mamirauá is an example of conservation in Brazil and in the world. It was the country's first Sustainable Development Reserve, which represented a paradigm shift in the protection of natural resources and in the way these resources are used.

All this natural and cultural wealth makes Mamirauá a perfect place for tourism. Starting in 1998, Uakari Lodge receives tourists from all over the world interested in observing the rich local fauna, associated with the floodplain environment and the sociocultural diversity of the riverine people. The tours include walks in the dry season, canoe and boat trips throughout the year (during the flood season it is possible to enter the forest with the canoe), visits to the community and interaction with researchers.

Motivation

The Mamirauá Reserve is one of the great examples of conservation success on the planet and an example of the union of different stakeholders in a common cause. From an overexploited area in the mid-1940s to 1970s, through work by the Catholic Church, which sought to organize local populations into communities to guarantee their rights and public policies; to the researchers from the Mamirauá Institute who came to know the local socio-biodiversity better and fight for the creation of a protected area and which until today operates daily in the region; the state of Amazonas, which is the manager of the area and other institutions present, the Mamirauá Reserve, today, is a protected area, abundant in natural resources and with income rates and quality of life much higher than in the past.

Along with this important history, the actions of the present are equally important and maintain the participatory tradition between the parties involved in the region. 

Boundary Map

Species or habitats

The Bald-headed Uakari (Cacajao calvus) is one of the symbols of the Mamirauá Reserve. It gave its name to Uakari Lodge and is one of the species most sought after by tourists thanks to the work of biologist Marcio Ayres who arrived in the region in the early 1980s and developed his doctoral research in the region. The reserve was set up to protect the Uakari, but above all, to create a protected area where the local population also have their rights respected and can use the natural resources in a legal and sustainable way. 

Area Features

Bald-headed Uakari (Cacajao calvus) - Species

Stability

Within the Mamirauá Reserve, the Bald-headed Uakari population is stable.

Threats

 Habitat loss, although this is not a major issue within the limits of the mamirauá reserve.

Actions taken for protection

Community-based Tourism - support to local communities in the protection of natural resources and dissemination of good practices in nature tourism. Carrying out outdoor activities to contemplate nature, watching wildlife and learn about local culture.

Scientific research - production of knowledge about the ecology of species and their relationship with the local population;

Environmental surveillance by communities - protection of species, especially those related to aquatic environments (in the area of the lodge there is financial support from the enterprise);

Activities for the sustainable management of natural resources - Technical advice for local communities on the sustainable use of natural resources and the use of traditional knowledge of nature, including training focused on ecotourism (techniques for guiding visitors, environmental interpretation, birdwatching, fauna monitoring) and environmental education actions;

Support for local organizations - technical advice for local associations (including participating Uakari Lodge associations);

Promotion of support programs to improve the quality of life of local populations - development of new technologies appropriate for the local context. An organized population with quality of life uses the environment in a much fairer and more balanced way;

All these activities, directly or indirectly, collaborate in the protection of the Reserve and its species.

Community Importance

Animal species are the main attractions for tourism at Uakari Lodge which, over its 25 years of existence, has proved to be an important source of income for a group of communities in the Mamirauá reserve, helping to generate jobs, supporting improvements in community infrastructure , enabling work for women and collaborating with their independence, carrying out training and environmental education.

The Uakari, despite the name of the lodge, is not widely known, but it certainly enchants those who manage to observe it.

In the end, if it weren't for these species, the Uakari Lodge would hardly have been so successful and would help to improve the quality of life of the local population.

Wildlife Watching Guidelines

Below are some Uakari Lodge rules related to wildlife observation:

- Do not touch the animals;

- Do not feed the animals;

- Do not disturb the animals;

Fact 1

If it weren't for the Uakari, the Mamirauá Reserve would not exist. It was to research this species that biologist Marcio Ayres arrived in the region in the early 1980s. Based on his doctoral research and his experience in the region, Marcio Ayres sought to create a reserve to protect the uakari, but above all, create a protected area where the local population also had their rights respected and could use the natural resources in a legal and sustainable way. The Bald-headed Uakari is one of the symbols of the Reserve, it gave its name to Uakari Lodge and is one of the species most sought after by tourists.

Fact 2

Fact 3

Black-Headed Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri vanzolinii) - Species

Stability

The Black-headed Squirrel Monkey population is in decline.

Threats

Climatic changes that can alter the forest configuration of the small home range where the species inhabits.

Actions taken for protection

Community-based Tourism - support to local communities in the protection of natural resources and dissemination of good practices in nature tourism. Carrying out outdoor activities to contemplate nature, watching wildlife and learn about local culture.

Scientific research - production of knowledge about the ecology of species and their relationship with the local population;

Environmental surveillance by communities - protection of species, especially those related to aquatic environments (in the area of the lodge there is financial support from the enterprise);

Activities for the sustainable management of natural resources - Technical advice for local communities on the sustainable use of natural resources and the use of traditional knowledge of nature, including training focused on ecotourism (techniques for guiding visitors, environmental interpretation, birdwatching, fauna monitoring) and environmental education actions;

Support for local organizations - technical advice for local associations (including participating Uakari Lodge associations);

Promotion of support programs to improve the quality of life of local populations - development of new technologies appropriate for the local context. An organized population with quality of life uses the environment in a much fairer and more balanced way;

All these activities, directly or indirectly, collaborate in the protection of the Reserve and its species.

Community Importance

Animal species are the main attractions for tourism at Uakari Lodge which, over its 25 years of existence, has proved to be an important source of income for a group of communities in the Mamirauá reserve, helping to generate jobs, supporting improvements in community infrastructure , enabling work for women and collaborating with their independence, carrying out training and environmental education.

Wildlife Watching Guidelines

Below are some Uakari Lodge rules related to wildlife observation:

- Do not touch the animals;

- Do not feed the animals;

- Do not disturb the animals;

Fact 1

Fact 2

Fact 3

Amazon River Dolphin (Inia geoffrensis) - Species

Stability

Amazon River Dolphin population is in decline.

Threats

Dams on rivers; conflict with humans due to fishing; use of its meat for fishing for “piracatinga”, a saprophagous catfish; river pollution.

Actions taken for protection

Community-based Tourism - support to local communities in the protection of natural resources and dissemination of good practices in nature tourism. Carrying out outdoor activities to contemplate nature, watching wildlife and learn about local culture.

Scientific research - production of knowledge about the ecology of species and their relationship with the local population;

Environmental surveillance by communities - protection of species, especially those related to aquatic environments (in the area of the lodge there is financial support from the enterprise);

Activities for the sustainable management of natural resources - Technical advice for local communities on the sustainable use of natural resources and the use of traditional knowledge of nature, including training focused on ecotourism (techniques for guiding visitors, environmental interpretation, birdwatching, fauna monitoring) and environmental education actions;

Support for local organizations - technical advice for local associations (including participating Uakari Lodge associations);

Promotion of support programs to improve the quality of life of local populations - development of new technologies appropriate for the local context. An organized population with quality of life uses the environment in a much fairer and more balanced way;

All these activities, directly or indirectly, collaborate in the protection of the Reserve and its species.

Community Importance

Animal species are the main attractions for tourism at Uakari Lodge which, over its 25 years of existence, has proved to be an important source of income for a group of communities in the Mamirauá reserve, helping to generate jobs, supporting improvements in community infrastructure , enabling work for women and collaborating with their independence, carrying out training and environmental education.

The pink dolphin is an iconic species of the Amazon and attract visitors from all over the world to try to see them. It should be noted that at Uakari Lodge only practices observation tourism and never feeds or touches the animals.

Wildlife Watching Guidelines

Below are some Uakari Lodge rules related to wildlife observation:

- Do not touch the animals;

- Do not feed the animals;

- Do not disturb the animals;

Fact 1

Pink Dolphin - often known as "enchanted" the boto is so much a part of Amazonian folklore that for many people, it's not folklore. Able to transform into a handsome and elegant man, the dolphin (in its humanized form) seduces women and impregnates them. Therefore, when pregnant women do not have a partner, there is a lot of talk that the child is the daughter of a boto.

Fact 2

Fact 3

Jaguar (Panthera onca) - Species

Stability

Jaguar populations are stable.

Threats

Conflict with human population.

Actions taken for protection

Community-based Tourism - support to local communities in the protection of natural resources and dissemination of good practices in nature tourism. Carrying out outdoor activities to contemplate nature, watching wildlife and learn about local culture.

Scientific research - production of knowledge about the ecology of species and their relationship with the local population;

Environmental surveillance by communities - protection of species, especially those related to aquatic environments (in the area of the lodge there is financial support from the enterprise);

Activities for the sustainable management of natural resources - Technical advice for local communities on the sustainable use of natural resources and the use of traditional knowledge of nature, including training focused on ecotourism (techniques for guiding visitors, environmental interpretation, birdwatching, fauna monitoring) and environmental education actions;

Support for local organizations - technical advice for local associations (including participating Uakari Lodge associations);

Promotion of support programs to improve the quality of life of local populations - development of new technologies appropriate for the local context. An organized population with quality of life uses the environment in a much fairer and more balanced way;

All these activities, directly or indirectly, collaborate in the protection of the Reserve and its species.

Community Importance

Animal species are the main attractions for tourism at Uakari Lodge which, over its 25 years of existence, has proved to be an important source of income for a group of communities in the Mamirauá reserve, helping to generate jobs, supporting improvements in community infrastructure , enabling work for women and collaborating with their independence, carrying out training and environmental education.

The jaguar is an iconic species of the Amazon and attract visitors from all over the world to try to see them. The jaguar, like other felines, is always difficult to observe, but it should be noted that at Uakari Lodge only practices observation tourism and never feeds or touches the animals.

Wildlife Watching Guidelines

Below are some Uakari Lodge rules related to wildlife observation:

- Do not touch the animals;

- Do not feed the animals;

- Do not disturb the animals;

During the Jaguar Expedition package:

- maximum number of tourists in each package: 6

- maximum number of packages per year: 4

- maximum animal observation time: 1 hour

Fact 1

Jaguar - Mamirauá jaguars are adapted to the floodplain environment. Scientific research has shown that this species remains in the reserve even when the water level is high. At that time, the jaguars remain on top of the trees. And what do they eat? In the dry season, they feed on caimans, but in the flooded season their diet is based on arboreal mammals, such as howler monkeys and sloths.

About 10 years ago, Uakari Lodge created a tourist package aimed to observing jaguars and exchanging information with researchers of the species. Jaguars monitored with a radio collar are sought out for observation, always with researchers. The income from this package, with only three departures per year and with a limited number of people, is destined for research and the communities, as a way of showing that the live jaguar can also be profitable. As a top predator, the relationship between the jaguar and local populations is conflicting, especially because it generates fear of attacking people and livestock. On the other hand, the jaguar is also an imposing symbol of beauty and power, generating great admiration in people.

Fact 2

Fact 3

Management Plan

Management Plan File

    Overview

    Title
    Amazon Uakari Heritage Area
    Level
    Candidate
    Name Location
    Mamirauá Reserve, Brazil
    Name Species Group
    Monkey
    Name Habitat Group
    Rain Forest
    Country
    BRA
    Approximate size (sq km)
    Uakari Lodge – 35 km2
    Back to Amazon Uakari Heritage Area